Thanks for the question Brian. I think the answer is “yes… it can, IF it is applied properly.”

When we say that there is an overarching strategic direction and that we pursue many smaller things inside of that opportunistically, these “smaller things” may not always actually be that small… there is a range… a spectrum if you will. Organizations must always be diligently on the lookout for “bends in the road” in their markets and prepare for them strategically.

So, depending on HOW disruptive a threat or opportunity is (does it threaten a small slice of their business, or the whole enterprise… is it operational or existential) will determine exactly how the organization treats it. In the first case, it may be seen as an opportunistic moment. In the latter, as a strategic moment. Either way, the enterprise has to have their finger on the pulse of the market, know the difference between these shifts (in scale and impact), and respond accordingly in both their strategies and actions.

So, bottom line… yes, any disruptive threat or opportunity fits with this model, so long as the organization has their eyes open and is expecting these to happen from time to time and operates accordingly.

Thanks!

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CEO — Legacy Innovation Group / Executive Director — Global Innovation Institute. Speaker. Writer. Scholar. Strategist. Adventurer. Global hitchhiker.

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Anthony Mills

Anthony Mills

CEO — Legacy Innovation Group / Executive Director — Global Innovation Institute. Speaker. Writer. Scholar. Strategist. Adventurer. Global hitchhiker.